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The Original Ginny Moon -Benjamin Ludwig ~ Blog Tour.

Ginny Moon

 

Back of the book :

The Original Ginny Moon’s painfully honest narrator is Ginny, a girl with autism living in a world that just doesn’t add up. Five years ago the police forcibly removed her from the home of her abusive mother Gloria.

Now fourteen and in her fourth Forever Home, Ginny is hell-bent on returning to her mothers apartment – despite knowing how dangerous that could be – to find something she insists she hid under the bed.

Ginny will steal, lie, plan her own kidnapping and tear apart every shred of the normal, stable life she currently has, just to find what she has left on the furthest edge of forever …

 

What I think :

Ginny Moon has at last got a Forever Mum and a Forever dad, (for the fourth time !) and she’s trying very hard to be good. However its proving very hard.

Ginny has autism and when she was nine years old the police came and took her away from her abusive and drug addict mum, Gloria.

Ever since then all Ginny wants to do is go back to the apartment to collect her ‘Baby Doll’ from the suitcase under the bed. Even although its very dangerous for her, she wants Gloria to ‘Kidnap’ her so she can get back to the home they once shared to get her ‘Baby Doll’, its very important to her. She has sent messages and told her the address In the hope that Gloria will come for her. Gloria has a restraining order preventing her from coming into contact with Ginny so its proving a bit problematic.

Will Ginny get back to the apartment, on the other side of Forever, to get the ‘Baby doll’ in the suitcase, or is it far too late …. ?

I really loved this sweet and gentle story about an autistic girl living in our ‘normal’ world. how is copes with life even although she had a pretty awful start to life.

I must admit I wasn’t too sure when I read the blurb on the back of the book, I didn’t think it was my kind of book. However it had me enchanted right from the first page to the last. It gathers you up and gently pulls you in.

The story is written in Ginny’s voice, so we find out exactly what she is thinking and feeling and also what she wants and what she must have, at any cost. its quite comical in places and very dry.

The author has done a fantastic job of conveying how Ginny’s thought processes happen, and even although she hasn’t been abused for five years, how it has affected her for possibly the rest of her life.

I really adored this debut novel and really hope that the author writes many more.

I give this lovely book 10/10. (5 stars)

5 gold stars

Published on 01/06/17 by HQ (Midas)

A very big Thank you to Samantha Evans at HQ for the review copy of the book.

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Obsession – Amanda Robson ~Blog Tour.

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Back of the book :

One evening a wife asks her husband a question : who else would you go for, if you could ? Its a simple question – a little game – that will destroy her life … 

Carly and Rob are a perfect couple. They share happy lives with their children and their close friends Jenni and Craig. They’re lucky. But beneath the surface, no relationship is simple : can another woman’s husband and another man’s wife ever be just good friends ?

Little by little, Carly’s question sends her life spiralling out of control, as she begins to doubt everything she has thought was true. Who can she trust ? The man she has promised to stick by forever, or the best friend she has known for years ? And is Carly being entirely honest with either of them ?

 

What I think : 

Carly is married to local doctor Rob, she also works at the surgery herself as the practice nurse. They have three children together, Pippa, John and Matthew. They have a really good life together.

Its whilst on a camping holiday with the children, in a moment of boredom, that Carly asks Rob a question, ‘ Who would you go for, if you could?’ after a moments thought Rob answers “Jenni’ I like Jenni. Jenni is married to Craig and they have been Carly and Rob’s best friends since the girls met at anti-natal classes years ago.

Its this question and its answer that starts a world of pain for everybody involved. It also starts an Obsession for Carly’s that she has no power over …

Wow ! this is an exceptional book, I really loved it from start to finish.

On the surface it looks although Carly and rob have a good life, a wonderful marriage, but scratch the surface bit and you discover cracks. Carly is quite a reluctant mother that is quite bored with her life. It would also seem that their friends Jenni and Craig’s marriage isn’t quite as wonderful as they make out either.

All the chapters in the story are short and from the point of view from each character, which I must admit did confuse me slightly to start with.

I found the book very dark and intense, it had a lot going on, all of the time. With many twists and turns you have to put the book down for a bit to work out what is going on. Which I thought wasn’t a bad thing as it really made me think about what I was reading.

The characters are very complex and I think they came across as human, they all behaved in a way that any person would that was in that sort of situation. What I think I’m trying to say is that I found them believable and relatable.

I was having a bit of a book slump ( where you aren’t able to pick up a book and read because you just can’t read ) before I started to read this one, however I just couldn’t put this book down. I read it in just over two days !

With a title like ‘Obsession’ I was really wondering what to expect, however I became quite ‘Obsessed’ myself, I really needed to find out how it ended. And talking of endings, the one in this book is quite superb, I really didn’t see that coming !!! I will say no more apart from go out and buy this book and get reading today, Its Brilliant !!

I give this spectacular thriller 10/10 (5 stars )

5 gold stars

Published by Avon Books on 04/05/17 on Ebook and 01/06/17 in Paperback.

A huge Thank you to Helena Sheffield for the review copy of the book.

Here for your reading pleasure is a extract of the book for you to enjoy …

Extract : 

Sitting at my desk, I switch the computer on to check my patient list. Eight patients this morning. Two breast checks. Three blood tests. Three sets of travel injections. As I press the buzzer for my first patient, the shadow that started following me on holiday begins to darken.

The shadow is no lighter when I finish at the surgery and am on my way to meet you, Jenni. You are waiting for me after work at the coffee shop, by the bus stop in the centre of town. I see you through the window as I move past the bus queue – sending a text from your iPhone, your glossy hair tumbling across your face. As soon as I enter the coffee shop you look up and beam at me, as if seeing me is the most important part of your day. Jenni, you always try to make people feel like that. As if they are important. It is one of your tricks. I know that now. When we first met, I fell for it.

We knew each other at nursing college, didn’t we, Jenni? But only from a distance. You weren’t really my type. Christian Union. No make-up. Didn’t look men in the eye. Rumour had it you didn’t go out on Saturday nights, stayed in to prepare your mind for the Lord on Sunday. Jenni. What were you like?

Our paths crossed again on a couples’ night nearly six years ago at our local NCT co-ordinator’s house, stranded together like beached whales on a low-slung sofa, so heavily pregnant that we could hardly change positions. Mark and John incu­bating inside us, almost ready to be born. I was the expert because I already had Pippa. You were stick thin except for your bump, which overwhelmed you, looking so worried as the NCT co-ordinator droned on about Braxton Hicks contractions and TENS machines and whether they worked. I looked at you as you listened, chocolate brown eyes closed in fear, and wanted to protect you. To hold you against me and tell you it’s not as bad as it sounds. (Even though with Pippa it was far worse.)

At the end of the meeting we went to the pub, I can’t remember which one of the four of us suggested it, but we all thought it was a good idea. We went to the White Swan, down by the river at the end of our road. A cold October night, sitting by the fire drinking orange juice and tonic water whilst the men cradled their pints. We were so engrossed in our own conversation, we didn’t talk to them much. It took me so long to find you, Jenni, the first female friend I really cared about. All through school and university, men had been my compan­ions. Women can be so bitchy, don’t you think? So temperamental. Men are kinder. Simpler. I had up to this point socialised with them more as a rule. But then came the female-dominated world of pregnancy and early childhood that led me to you.

Today, with Mark and John at school, and another birth behind each of us, we hug clumsily across a small wooden table in the coffee shop opposite the surgery. Across the coffee you are already halfway through drinking. Across the crumbs of someone else’s cake. I sit down on an uncomfortable wooden stool, which scrapes across the floor as I position it.

‘How was your holiday?’ you ask.

‘Awful.’

‘That wasn’t what Rob said.’

Your words punch into me.

‘When did you see Rob?’ I ask.

‘I didn’t. He texted me.’

‘Texted you?’

‘Because he was worried about you.’

You wave and smile at the waitress, who starts to weave towards our table.

We order fresh coffee for you, and chocolate cake and cappuc­cino for me. The waitress presses our order into a small handheld machine and disappears to the next table.

‘Why is Rob so worried about me?’

‘He said you weren’t yourself on holiday. You didn’t seem to enjoy spending time with the children, apparently.’

‘Well, did you when you were on holiday?’

Your toffee brown eyes widen as you look at me.

‘Yes.’

Yes?

Jenni. You sanctimonious, husband-stealing bitch.

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Under a Sardinian Sky – Sara Alexander ~Blog Tour.

Under A Sardinian Sky

 

Back of the book :

In Mina’s family only one topic has ever been off limits : Her Aunt Carmella ….

For Mina, the silence surrounding the black sheep of the family is a personal obsession. She has resisted prying, but now, with her mothers health failing, its time to learn the truth.

1952 Simus, Sardina.

Carmela Chirigoni, a farmers daughter, is engaged to Franco, son of Simps’ wealthiest family. But Carmela is drawn to the charismatic – and married – Captain Joe Kavanagh, an American officer stationed at a local army base. Hired as his interpreter, Carmela resolves to ignore her feelings, knowing that any future together will only bring heartache to both families.

As Mina follows Carmela’s story, she discovers a past still deeply alive, revealing a story of hope, sacrifice and extraordinary love …

 

What I think : 

The prologue begins with the funeral of Mina’s Aunt Zia, her mothers sister. Her mother herself is quite ill, with cancer. There was also another sister who no-one talks about, Carmela. Nobody will say why she’s not talked about, just that she did ‘something bad’.

Mina decides to write her story and this is how the book is shaped. It starts in 1952 with Carmela who is a young girl and is engaged to the local land owners son, Franco.  She is happy(ish) until one day she meets Joe Kavanagh, an American Captain who has been stationed nearby. When Joe needs a interpreter so he can speak to the local land owners about renting their land for the military, Carmela fits the bill as she can speak English pretty well. As they start to spend time together, the inevitable happens and they begin to have feelings for each other. Joe has responsibilities back home and of course Carmela is engaged to Franco. They both know it would be impossible for anything to happen, or would it … ?

The book is mainly about Carmela’s story, its tells of her life in the early 1950’s onwards. I really enjoyed the wonderful descriptions of the Italian scenery and the sights and sounds around her. Not forgetting the food ! So much food !!

Its not just about Carmela falling in love with someone who is forbidden but also of her becoming ‘herself’ at long last. And also realising that there is life outside of the village of Simius. It really is her journey of discovery. The characters were wonderfully written and I really engrossed in it and lost a few hours quite a few times !

I thought the cover was quite beautiful, and it really made me want to visit Sardinia for myself one day.

I really enjoyed this wonderfully sunny coming of age book and give it 8/10 ( Four Stars )

four-starsPublished by HQ on 20/04/17.

A really big thank you to Rebekah Humphries at Midas for the review copy of the book in exchange for a honest review.

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An Unsuitable Marriage – Colette Dartford -Blog Tour.

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Back of the book :

When the worst happens, could your marriage survive ? 

Olivia had everything – a loving husband in Geoffrey, a thoughtful and intelligent son in Edward, a beautiful home in the somerset country side.

But all that changed when Geoffrey’s factory went bust and many of their friends and neighbours lost their jobs. Now homeless and facing bankruptcy, Geoffrey moves in with his recently widowed mother, whilst Olivia is forced to work as a housekeeper at her son’s elite boarding school.

With their marriage under intolerable strain, Geoffrey makes a mistake that has devastating consequences for the guilty and innocent alike. Has he torn his family apart, or can he find a way to bring them back together ?

 

What I think : 

Olivia’s life has been better, she used to have a lovely, big house called Manor farm, in the country. But all that changed when her husbands factory went bust. She’s now working and living as a house parent at the very posh school that her son Edward goes to.(she doesn’t know how much longer he can continue at the school, she’s hoping he can get a scholarship)  Her husband Geoffrey has moved in with his mother, who recently lost her husband, Geoffrey’s father. This causes a problem when Olivia comes home for the school holidays as she doesn’t get on with Rowena, her mother-in-law. Her Marriage isn’t all that great either, ever since everything that happened. Her hubby has discovered a new hobby – porn ! Olivia doesn’t know about his little habit yet, however its only time until she does. Edward is having problems at school as well, Can Olivia cope with this brand new life that she seems to be living or has something got to give … ?

I really enjoyed Colette’s first book so I was really excited to receive a copy of her next book, however I did think that she took this book in a slightly different direction than the last one.

There are some quite well-written characters, I thought that Rowena, Geoffrey’s mother was slightly misunderstood, all she wanted was to fill the gap that the death of her husband has left, by looking after her only son. I really wasn’t too sure about Geoffrey, he seemed a bit wet and ineffectual. Sadly, that was still my opinion when I finished reading the book. Olivia on the other hand was a very strong character, hell, she needed to be after everything that was happening !

I liked this book in as much as it was a good story about life, families and relationships the good and the bad.  It did take a few turns that surprised me, and it did think it ended how it should have done.

It is a good second novel from this talented novelist, I give it a well earned 8/10 (four stars)

four-stars

Published on 09/03/2017 by Zaffre (Midas Books)

A huge Thank you to Olivia Neilson from Midas Books for the review copy of the book in return for an honest review.

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A londoner by birth, Colette Dartford went to university in Bath and made it her home.  A scholarship to undertake a doctorate led to a career in health and social research, before she moved to California’s Napa Valley. Here she studied Viticulture and Enology and wrote her debut novel.

 

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The Good Daughter – Alexandra Burt – Blog Tour.

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Back of the book :

What if you were the worst crime your mother ever committed ?

Dahila’s childhood memories consist of stuffy cars, seedy motels, and a rootless existance travelling the country with her eccentric mother. Years later, she desperately wants to distance herself from that life. Yet one thing is stopping her from moving forward : she has questions.

In order to understand her past, Dahlia must go back. Back to her mother in the stifling town of Aurora. Back into the past of a woman on the brink of madness. But after she discovers three grave like mounds on a neighbouring farm, Dahlia learns that in her mother’s world of secrets, not all questions are meant to be answered …

What I think : 

Dahlia has returned home to the small town of Aurora, To take care of her mother, Memphis, who has gone a bit batty. And also to ask her mother about her childhood before its too late. Dahlia doesn’t remember much about her childhood, she knows she never went to school, and her mother said that she ‘home schooled’ her, but she can’t actually remember her mother being there much. She just remembers moving around a lot. These are the type of things that she needs to ask her about. She’s been home a for a little while when one day she goes out for a jog and finds a a woman almost buried in the woods. It turns out that the woman is still alive and in a coma, but no-one seems to know who she is. This incident for Dahlia starts to bring up forgotten memories, what secrets has her mother been keeping all these years … ?

Quinn is only young when her father meets and marries Sigrid. They don’t really get on, so when her father dies unexpectedly when she’s a teenager, she’s left to her own devices. Sigrid is on the lookout for another husband and doesn’t take any notice of what Quinn is doing. When Quinn gets herself a boyfriend, Bennito, she starts sneaking out at night to meet him, one night after Quinn and Bennito meet up, she decides to walk home through the woods. Its there she is attacked and raped by three men, and is injured quite badly. After around three months Sigrid tells her that its time to get herself  a husband. She goes to a house sale and it’s there she meets Nolan Creed. when after only a few months he asks her to marry him, she jumps at the chance. She moves to a small town and onto his family farm. Will she be able to bear to live there and will Nolan still want her when he finds out her secret … ?

I want to first say that I really enjoyed Alexandra’s first book ‘little girl lost’ so I was quite excited to read this one. I must admit, it does start off quite slowly and does take a while to get going. However once its gets into it stride it shapes up to be a brilliant novel.

I really did like this book, it has many twists and quite a few turns. It really does take you on quite a roller coaster ride. It is quite dark in places. I found the relationship between Dahlia and her mother quite odd, if I’m honest. Sometimes OK with each other and others like her mother hated her and sometimes like she didn’t even know her at all. But I think that if they’d have gotten on all time it wouldn’t have added to the atmosphere of the book.

I did have one compliant and that was I had trouble fitting Quinn and Aella in. You don’t find out who they are and how they fit until quite far into the book and if I’m truthful it did throw me a bit.

I enjoyed this book and give it 8/10 (4 stars)

four-stars

Published on 23/02/17 by Avon Books.

A very big Thank you to Avon books and Helena Sheffield for the review copy of the book in return for a honest review.

Here for your reading pleasure is an extract of the book :

Extract :

They stopped once for the night, in Albuquerque. The name of the city intrigued the girl, so she looked it up in the encyclopedia she carried with her. It was her most prized possession.

Albuhkirkee … She silently repeated the word until it lost all meaning. The girl caught herself drifting off into some paranoid daydream, not knowing what time it was or where they were going. They had never driven this far for so long, never had to pump gas so many times.

Weary with the burden of her heavy eyelids, she was drunk with sleep by the time her mother stopped at a hotel. Rodeside Inn, the sign read. All she’d remember later were the weeds that grew through the cracks of the concrete parking lot.

The next morning, her mother bought donuts at a drive-through and they got back on the road. The girl went to sleep, but when she woke up and looked out the window, the scenery hadn’t changed at all. After days on the road, she felt as if she was leaking electricity. The hours stretched, and she wished her mother hadn’t thrown her bag in the trunk of the Lincoln—she longed for her American Girl magazine and the jelly bean–flavored ChapStick.

She opened a bag of Red Vines, sucked on them, and then gently rubbed them over her lips until they turned crimson.

Running her fingers across the cracked spine of her encyclopedia—the first pages were missing and she’d never know what words came before accordion; a box-shaped bellows-driven musical instrument, colloquially referred to as a squeezebox—she concentrated on the sound of the pages rustling like old parchment as she flipped through the tattered book.

Her mother called her Pet. The girl didn’t like the name, especially when her mother introduced her. This is Pet, she’d say with a smile. She’s very shy. Then her mother moved on quickly, as if she had told too much already.

Pet, the encyclopedia said, a domestic or tamed animal kept for companionship. Treated with care and affection.

The girl opened the encyclopedia to a random page. She remembered when it was new, how the pages and the spine had not yielded as readily, and she wondered if the pages would eventually shed. She attempted to focus on a word but the movement of the car made her nauseous. Eventually she just left the book cracked open in her lap.

“My feet are cold. Can I get a pair of socks from the trunk?” she asked somewhere after the New Mexico/Texas border.

“Not now,” her mother said and checked her watch.

The girl fell asleep again and later awoke to the slamming of the car door. She rubbed her eyes and her surroundings came into focus: red brick walls, a large sign that read Midpoint Café, her mother standing by a pay phone only a few feet away, rummaging through her purse for change. It was noon and the girl felt ravenous as she stared at a display poster of fries and milkshakes in the café window.

“I’m hungry,” she called out to her mother.

“It has to be quick, we have to be somewhere,” the mother said, and the girl slid on her sandals in a hurry.

In the gloom of the dingy café, their knees touched under the narrow table. The mother opened up a newspaper left behind in the booth and scanned the headlines.

The girl had so many questions: Why are we rushing?; Who did you call?; Where are we going?; Why did we drive all the way from California to Texas?—she had the whole conversation planned out, knew exactly what to ask: short, direct questions that left no room for vague and elusive answers. The place was loud and crowded and the diners competed with one another to be heard, creating an overall atmosphere of raucousness. In the background, a baby cried and a waitress dropped a plate.

They ordered lunch—French fries and a strawberry shake for the girl, coffee and a Reuben sandwich, no sauerkraut, for the mother—and while they waited for their order to arrive, the mother excused herself. “I have to make another call, I’ll be right back.”

She ate and watched the diners and minutes later, her mother returned. She had seemingly perked up, now appeared bubbly, almost as if in a state of anticipation, and her eyes moved quickly. “Let’s play a game,” she said and opened the paper. “Tell me a number between one and twenty-two.”

The girl loved numbers. Numerology; belief in divine, mystical or other special relationship between a number and a coinciding event. The number 7 was her favorite one. 7 meant she was a seeker, a thinker, always trying to understand underlying hidden truths.

“Seven,” the girl said and silently recited random facts: seven ancient wonders of the world, seven days of the week, seven colors of the rainbow.

They ate silently, the girl devouring the fries, then taking her time with the milkshake, studying the people around her while her mother skimmed page seven of the newspaper. She wondered how naming a number of a page was a game to begin with, but her mother seldom answered questions posed to her, and so she didn’t ask.

The mother paid the check and the waitress counted out the change.

Just as the girl attempted to decipher the headline the mother had been studying, she called out to her. “Hurry up, Pet.”

The girl did as she was told.

Later, the mother rolled down the window and the girl watched her check her face in the rearview mirror. When a siren sounded, the mother licked her lips, fluffed her hair, and pulled into a dirt patch where three wooden posts formed an entrance with a cow skull nailed to its very top. An officer appeared next to the car.

“Your headlight’s out,” he said and scanned the car’s interior.

The police officer was lean with closely cropped hair and skin the color of nutmeg. The mother got out of the car, pulled her red scarf tighter around her head. Her hair fluttered in the wind, her clothes clung to her body, and her arms were tightly wrapped around her.

The girl noticed a boy in the back of the police cruiser. “What did he do?” she called out to the officer.

“He didn’t do anything. That’s my son, Roberto,” he said, “he’s just riding along.”

The next time the girl turned around, her mother and the officer were standing in the shade of a large oak tree. Her mother’s voice trailed toward the car like pearls rubbing gently against each other. The officer leaned back and laughed at something her mother said.

Later, the mother drove to a motel, where the girl fell into a deep sleep. The next morning, after free coffee from the dingy lounge and day-old donuts, they emerged from the Aurora Police Precinct with paperwork in their hands. When the girl read the paperwork, it stated Memphis Waller and her daughter Dahlia Waller had been robbed by the side of the road, including the mother’s wallet and identification.

Dahlia; flower, symbolic meaning of a commitment and a bond that lasts forever.

The girl did not ask questions. She was glad to finally have a proper name and no one, not even her mother, would refer to her as Pet ever again.

Later, she would remember that the sky was overcast and turning darker by the minute.

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The Silent Fountain – Victoria Fox – Blog Tour.

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Back of the book : 

Hollywood, 1978

Tragedy sends troubled film star Vivien Lockhart into the arms of Giovanna Moretti – and it seems her fortunes have finally changed. Until she meets his sister and learns that dark shadows haunt her new husbands past ….

Tuscany, present day 

Lucy Whittaker needs to disappear. But her new home, the crumbling Castillo Barbarossa, is far from the secluded paradise it seemed. Strange noises come from the attic. The owner of the house will never meet her in person.

The fountain in the courtyard is silent – but has never run dry …

Across the decades, Vivian and Lucy find themselves trapped in the idyllic Italian Villa. And if they are ever to escape its walls, they must first unearth its secrets ….

 

What I think :

Lucy needs to get away, she’s done something really ‘bad’ and needs some ‘thinking time’. ( you don’t actually find out what the ‘bad’ thing is until a lot later) Her friend Belinda, Bill for short, knows someone that has a house that needs looking after in Italy. So after having a telephone interview, she hops on a plane and heads off to Italy.

Almost as soon as she gets to the villa she realises things aren’t quite what they’re supposed to be. For instance, she’s never met the owner, just the rather abrupt maid instead. The attic is absolutely out of bounds to everybody, yet she hears weird noises coming from it every time she walks past the door. And what is it with the silent fountain out the front of the house …?

Vivian, a seventies film star, is the owner of the villa Castillo Barbarossa, shes bed bound now and really can’t bear to face the outside world, what has happened to make her retreat into her own world … ?

The story is told in two parts, 2016 and the 1970’s. The stories of both women are told in the now, which is Lucy’s story and in the Seventies, which is Vivien’s story from when she was a sixteen year old child with a brutal father. how she runs away from home and the struggles she faces as she rises to stardom.

I really liked the story and I loved the atmospheric feel, it really kept you on the edge of your seat really wanting to find out more about Vivien’s early life. I thought that the characters were the best that Victoria has written yet, so normal, in Lucy’s case and descriptive in Viven’s, I felt really sorry for her when she was a teenager with that awful father of hers.

But what I really liked even more was the change in direction that Victoria has taken. Don’t get me wrong, I really loved all her other books, but this one I thought, was more of a thriller than a bonkbuster ! I loved that it was slow burning with many twists and turns along the way. Slowly unravling the secrets that have been hidden in the walls of the villa.

I give this wonderful new direction of a thriller 9/10 (5 stars )5 gold stars

Published by HQ (Harper Collins) on 09/03/16.

A big Thank you to Olivia Neilson at Harper collins for the review copy of the book in exchange for a honest review

Before The Rains – Dinah Jefferies. – Blog Tour.

 

 

 

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Back of the book :

1930, Rajputana, India.

Since her husband’s death, 28-year-old photojournalist Eliza’s only companion has been her camera. When the British Government send her to an Indian princely state to photograph the royal family, she’s determined to make a name for herself.

But when Eliza arrives at the palace she meets Jay, the Prince’s handsome, brooding brother. While Eliza awakens Jay to the poverty of his people, he awakens her to the injustices of British rule. Soon Jay and Eliza find they have more in common than they think. But their families – and society – think otherwise. Eventually they will have to make a choice between doing what’s expected, or following their hearts. . .

 

What I think : 

In Dec 1912, In India, Eliza and her mother Anna, witnessed the death of her father. He was in a state procession and someone threw a bomb and he was blown up. Thirteen years later, a widower herself, her husband was in a motor accident, she has managed to carve a career out for herself as a photojournalist. when a family friend, Clifford Salter, offers her a job to photograph the Indian royal family for a year, she jumps at the chance. Almost as soon as she gets there, she meets Prince Jayent, the younger brother of the current Prince apparent. She doesn’t really take to him to start with, but as they start spending time together they become friends. As Eliza’s time progresses in India she sees and hears things that shock and upset her. She also realises that there is a lot of poverty in that part of India. She goes to Jay for help, its then, that they realise that their friendship is turning into something forbidden ….

I’ve always had a soft spot for Dinah’s books, ever since I won a copy of ‘The Separation’ a couple of years ago. I always really look forward to Dinah’s next book coming out. So you can imagine how excited I was when I was asked to be on the Blog Tour for this book. I really think that this novel is Dinah’s best yet !

Dinah transported me back to 1930’s India with her wonderful descriptions of the places, sights and sounds. Her brilliantly written characters make me feel as if I was in the background watching it all unfold first hand. I could almost smell the pungent spices and the acrid smoke.

I really couldn’t and didn’t put this book down, I read it all in two sittings. I really do highly recommend this brilliant book and give it a really well-earned 10/10.

 

5 gold stars

 

Published by Viking (Penguin Books) on 23/02/17

A huge Thank you to Josie Murdoch and Penguin Books for the review copy of the book.

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